boingboing:

Charles Burns brings his haunting cartoon trilogy to a close with Sugar Skull

Legendary cartoonist Charles Burns gives Patrick Lohier (and the rest of us) a glimpse into the dark, animated world of his haunting trilogy.


magictransistor:

Alberto Martini. Illustrations for the stories of Edgar Allan Poe. 1909.

Source magictransistor


50 Cent Challenges Floyd Mayweather to Read Harry Potter
In a twist on the #ALSIceBucketChallenge, hip-hop artist 50 Cent challenged champion boxer Floyd Mayweather to read Harry Potter. The stakes? A $750,000 donation to a charity of Mayweather’s choice.Now we see if the pound-for-pound champ has a little phoenix feather at his core.
via SBNation

50 Cent Challenges Floyd Mayweather to Read Harry Potter

In a twist on the #ALSIceBucketChallenge, hip-hop artist 50 Cent challenged champion boxer Floyd Mayweather to read Harry Potter. The stakes? A $750,000 donation to a charity of Mayweather’s choice.

Now we see if the pound-for-pound champ has a little phoenix feather at his core.

via SBNation


mashable:

IMPROMPTU CAPTION CONTEST: Game of Thrones' Littlefinger, Roose Bolton and Varys walk into a 7-Eleven.Go!

Varys: Baelish would burn the Doritos to the ground just to be king of the Fudgesicles.

mashable:

IMPROMPTU CAPTION CONTEST: Game of Thrones' Littlefinger, Roose Bolton and Varys walk into a 7-Eleven.

Go!

Varys: Baelish would burn the Doritos to the ground just to be king of the Fudgesicles.


classicpenguin:

If you’ve been following our celebration of #dorothyparkerweek on social media, you might be surprised at some of the amazing facts we’ve unearthed (with the help of Parker expert Marion Meade). If you’re just tuning in, here’s a few things you might not know:

  • The FBI’s file on Parker runs more than 900 pages. 
  • Dorothy never learned to cook. Or drive.
  • Parker was an eyewitness during the Spanish Civil War.
  • 90% of witticisms attributed to Dorothy were probably not really by her.
  • Parker left her estate to Martin Luther King, Jr.

For many, many more of these fascinating facts, check out Marion Meade’s The Last Days of Parker.


hideback:

Gustave Doré (French, 1832-1883)

Satan Resting on the Mountain, Paradise Lost, circa 1866

Source hideback


It looks to me very much like a significant section of the public, having given up on attempting to understand the reality they are actually living in, have instead reasoned that they might at least be able to comprehend the sprawling, meaningless, but at-least-still-finite ‘universes’ presented by DC or Marvel Comics. I would also observe that it is, potentially, culturally catastrophic to have the ephemera of a previous century squatting possessively on the cultural stage and refusing to allow this surely unprecedented era to develop a culture of its own, relevant and sufficient to its times.

Source theguardian.com


Industry News from a Series of TubesAugust 21, 2014
Behind the Lit: Baudelaire the Conservative
Why Bookends is the most frustrating feature in the New York Times Book Review.
Graphic novel crowdfund round-up: a schizophrenic sketchpad, amphibians raising hell, damsels taking the lead, bardic fury, and the return of Watson & Holmes.
The fantastic (free) nonfiction of great novelists.
Terrifying YA horror in which the cheerleader lives.
Malala Yousafzai, a global crusader for women’s education and literacy, has extended her reach once more—to her family.
The History of Print.
In praise of the simple sentence.
Image via The Atlantic
-David Schuller

Industry News from a Series of Tubes
August 21, 2014

Behind the Lit: Baudelaire the Conservative

Why Bookends is the most frustrating feature in the New York Times Book Review.

Graphic novel crowdfund round-up: a schizophrenic sketchpad, amphibians raising hell, damsels taking the lead, bardic fury, and the return of Watson & Holmes.

The fantastic (free) nonfiction of great novelists.

Terrifying YA horror in which the cheerleader lives.

Malala Yousafzai, a global crusader for women’s education and literacy, has extended her reach once more—to her family.

The History of Print.

In praise of the simple sentence.

Image via The Atlantic

-David Schuller



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