fantagraphics:

The Amateurs is great. Conor Stechschulte knocked it out of the park.” – Sammy Harkham

"Stechschulte just has an uncanny knack for merging the humor of awkwardness with bloody, visceral violence." – Rob Clough

The Amateurs
by Conor Stechschulte

64-page black & white 6” x 9” softcover • $14.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-734-5

Due to arrive in about 2-3 weeks. Click the thumbnails for larger versions; get more info, see more previews and pre-order your copy here:

http://www.fantagraphics.com/theamateurs


wordbookstores:

While we are not yet able to send donuts via the internet, we think we’ve got the high-fives down. (KITTY!)

Great. Step out for ten minutes to eat a mozzarella and tomato sandwich and miss the Internet party. 


writersnoonereads:

The stories of R. A. Lafferty are returning to print*, though in small editions: Centipede Press will publish his collected stories as limited-edition hardcovers — up to 12 volumes — starting with The Man Who Made Models. Centipede says:

In a career that began in 1959 and continued until his death in 2002, R.A. Lafferty garnered the admiration of authors and editors including Robert A.W. Lowndes, Harlan Ellison, A.A. Attanasio, Gene Wolfe, Michael Swanwick and many, many others. His body of short fiction is comprised of well over 200 stories and, despite his vast popularity, there was never a concerted effort made to produce a comprehensive collection of his short fiction, until now. 

Welcome to the first volume in a series that will run to a dozen volumes collecting all of R.A. Lafferty’s short fiction. Whether it be well-known stories such as “Narrow Valley” or more obscure work such as “The Man Who Made Models,” all will be collected here in the Lafferty Library. Each volume will feature close to 100,000 words of Lafferty’s fiction and each volume will feature an afterword by series editor John Pelan and a guest introduction by a notable author in the field of fantastic fiction. 

These scans are from the 50 Watts hoard (the cover art for Nine Hundred Grandmothers is by Leo & Diane Dillon). No word when or if Lafferty’s novels will be reprinted. I love Past Master (1968) — it’s science fiction but the main character is Thomas More — and my copy is in tatters.

Here also is the bio from Centipede's site: 

R.A. Lafferty (1914–2002) was an American science fiction and fantasy writer known for his original use of language, metaphor, and narrative structure, as well as for his etymological wit. He also wrote a set of four autobiographical novels, In a Green Tree, a history book, The Fall of Rome, and a number of novels that could be more or less loosely called historical fiction. Lafferty’s quirky prose drew from traditional storytelling styles, largely from the Irish and Native American, and his shaggy-dog characters and tall tales are unique in science fiction. Little of Lafferty’s writing is considered typical of the genre.

*The first volume is already sold out (at least from the publisher). When I drafted this post last week it was still available. Kind of sad.

@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook


theatlantic:

Was Shakespeare a Good Actor?

Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, today, will bring an outpouring of written appreciations for his works. Many, though, will likely omit or only fleetingly mention one fact: Shakespeare’s first acts of creation were not poems or plays, but the characters he gave life to as a struggling actor.
This is no small omission. The stage is where Shakespeare taught others to lose sight of him, where he taught himself to lose sight of Shakespeare. The first lesson served him as a player, the second as a playwright. Omit the stage, and you omit the origin of William Shakespeare.
Read more.


It’s amazing to think how much impact he had on the English language and he only lived to the age of 52. Imagine a world with 30 more years of Shakespeare.

theatlantic:

Was Shakespeare a Good Actor?

Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, today, will bring an outpouring of written appreciations for his works. Many, though, will likely omit or only fleetingly mention one fact: Shakespeare’s first acts of creation were not poems or plays, but the characters he gave life to as a struggling actor.

This is no small omission. The stage is where Shakespeare taught others to lose sight of him, where he taught himself to lose sight of Shakespeare. The first lesson served him as a player, the second as a playwright. Omit the stage, and you omit the origin of William Shakespeare.

Read more.

It’s amazing to think how much impact he had on the English language and he only lived to the age of 52. Imagine a world with 30 more years of Shakespeare.


National Poetry Month: Q&A with Traci Brimhall

Traci Brimhall is the author of Our Lady of the Ruins (W.W. Norton, 2012), selected by Carolyn Forché for the 2011 Barnard Women Poets Prize, and Rookery (Southern Illinois University Press, 2010), winner of the 2009 Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award and finalist for the ForeWord Book of the Year Award. 

Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The New Yorker, Poetry, New England Review, Ploughshares, Slate, The Believer, Kenyon Review, and The New Republic. Her work has also been featured on Poetry Daily, Verse Daily, Best of the NetPBS Newshour, and Best American Poetry 2013 & 2014. She is also a co-author with Brynn Saito of a collaborative chapbook, Bright Power, Dark Peace (Diode Editions, 2013). She holds degrees from Florida State University (BA) and Sarah Lawrence College (MFA). Currently, she teaches creative writing at Western Michigan University where she is a doctoral candidate and a King/​Chávez/​Parks Fellow.

1. Imagine you’re a poetry lobbyist in D.C.: What would be the first thing on your agenda?

Re-launch Reading Rainbow and devote episodes to poetry!

2. Name one other poet who has influenced you profoundly and why.

Brigit Pegeen Kelly because of her fierce and fearsome vision of the world. I’ll never forget the first time I read the poem “Song.”

3. Recommend one print and one online publication you think everyone should read this month.

The Paris-American is a great online publication that features several poems by a new poet every week. The poems are always stunning. I’d also recommend getting an issue of POETRY. It’s a journal that’s been around a long time and plenty of people know it, but they may not know that the new editor, Don Share, has been choosing some incredibly vital and risky poems.


abramscomicarts:

Mindful of the potential environmental impact of a book of this length, Abrams has printed CLIMATE CHANGED: A PERSONAL JOURNEY THROUGH THE SCIENCE on FSC-certified paper from responsibly-managed sources that take into account not only the maintenance of the ecosystem, but also the longterm wellbeing of industry workers, the health of the surrounding communities, and the rights of indigenous peoples. CLIMATE CHANGED is also available, paper-free, in ebook format.

abramscomicarts:

Mindful of the potential environmental impact of a book of this length, Abrams has printed CLIMATE CHANGED: A PERSONAL JOURNEY THROUGH THE SCIENCE on FSC-certified paper from responsibly-managed sources that take into account not only the maintenance of the ecosystem, but also the longterm wellbeing of industry workers, the health of the surrounding communities, and the rights of indigenous peoples. CLIMATE CHANGED is also available, paper-free, in ebook format.

Source abramsbooks.com


flavorpill:


She treats writing like a regular 9 to 5 job (including the built-in time-wasting).
A 9 to 5 job in which I actually work about 6 hours and wander around the house thinking about working the other two. My goals are never to hit a word count — I’ve tried that before and for me it leads to sloppy, panicked writing. I try to think in terms of scenes: Where am I in the book and what scene would I like to get done today? I never wait for the inspiration to strike. That would be a long, sad wait.Successful writing is one part inspiration and two parts sheer stubbornness.

15 Things We Learned From Gillian Flynn’s Reddit AMA

flavorpill:

She treats writing like a regular 9 to 5 job (including the built-in time-wasting).

A 9 to 5 job in which I actually work about 6 hours and wander around the house thinking about working the other two. My goals are never to hit a word count — I’ve tried that before and for me it leads to sloppy, panicked writing. I try to think in terms of scenes: Where am I in the book and what scene would I like to get done today? I never wait for the inspiration to strike. That would be a long, sad wait.Successful writing is one part inspiration and two parts sheer stubbornness.

15 Things We Learned From Gillian Flynn’s Reddit AMA


Industry News from a Series of TubesApril 23, 2014
David Foster Wallace’s Estate Opposes BiopicBut it stars Jason Segel and Jesse Eisenberg. It can’t be that bad, right? (Hosted)
Storybird Launches Longform FormatSerialization and connectivity. Jargon. Synergy. (Publishers Weekly)
Elizabeth McCracken: “I Plan to Eat the Humorless!”With fava beans and a bottle of chianti. (Salon) Available here.
Are You There God? It’s Me, BarbaraHow to write a memoir about religion. How not to write a memoir about religion. (The Stranger) Available here and here.
Literary Bars and RestaurantsChuck Palahniuk introduced me to Voodoo Doughnut on some travel show years ago, but I guess E.L. James gets to be on the list… (The Airship)
-David Schuller

Industry News from a Series of Tubes
April 23, 2014

David Foster Wallace’s Estate Opposes Biopic
But it stars Jason Segel and Jesse Eisenberg. It can’t be that bad, right? (Hosted)

Storybird Launches Longform Format
Serialization and connectivity. Jargon. Synergy. (Publishers Weekly)

Elizabeth McCracken: “I Plan to Eat the Humorless!”
With fava beans and a bottle of chianti. (Salon) Available here.

Are You There God? It’s Me, Barbara
How to write a memoir about religion. How not to write a memoir about religion. (The Stranger) Available here and here.

Literary Bars and Restaurants
Chuck Palahniuk introduced me to Voodoo Doughnut on some travel show years ago, but I guess E.L. James gets to be on the list… (The Airship)

-David Schuller


melvillehouse:

myimaginarybrooklyn:

auspiciousplatypus:
"A Book of Four-Footed Beasts”, London,1666. 

Somewhere off in the distance, an ostrich sheds a single lonely tear.

melvillehouse:

myimaginarybrooklyn:

auspiciousplatypus:

"A Book of Four-Footed Beasts”, London,1666. 

Somewhere off in the distance, an ostrich sheds a single lonely tear.

Source auspiciousplatypus



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